3d


House of the Dead Overkill was released for the Nintendo Wii two years ago, and it remains one of our favorite games for the system, although it's tragically overlooked. Thankfully, we're drawing close to Halloween and Sega has updated the graphics for the PlayStation 3, added some bonus content, and re-released the game with support for the PlayStation Move.

So what's new? First, the game looks much better, and there are two brand-new levels and more collectibles to find throughout the levels. The Move is a great fit for this sort of lightgun game, and the wonderfully profane writing and grindhouse-style jokes remain. This is a game that delights in its "Mature" rating, and doesn't pull any of its goofy punches in the name of good taste.

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Nintendo enjoys creating hardware that offers new ways to interact with games, such as the Wii's motion controls, or the 3D screen of the upcoming 3DS. The problem with the new portable is a distressing one, and it may become increasingly apparent as time goes on: not everyone can see the 3D images. That means that Nintendo's ability to create games that rely on that central mechanic is limited, unless they want to alienate a portion of their audience. This is the rare case of a company launching with a new technology it seems unwilling to use to its fullest capabilities.

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3D Nintendo

The first question to ask is – does Nintendo need saving? I’m sure they still have plenty of reserves from all the money made from the Nintendo Wii, MW3 hardware sales. Not to mention all the profit made from the accessories sold. However, 2010 wasn’t a stellar year for the company we love so much. The other consoles played catchup, and the hot trend of Wii ownership petered out. Not to mention Microsoft and Sony releasing motion control options for their perspective consoles.

Nintendo did have an ace up their sleeve, and it came during the E3 presentation earlier in the year. The Nintendo 3DS was announced, and with it came a handheld which would provide 3D gaming without the need of glasses. Amazement ensued.

Here we are in 2011, and the 3DS is a few months away from launch. The hype surrounding the system is still growing strong, as there has been announcements coming this week concerning more of the technical specs. Along with more information regarding the games coming out.

With all of this hype, one has to wonder if 3D will be the next shift for Nintendo. It is most definitely a technological feat to release a 3D handheld with the capabilities the 3DS will have. Could the handheld be a peak at what Nintendo has planned for the living room?

The whole 3D trend has been interesting to watch unfold, like in modern warfare 3. In the theaters, the prospect of 3D movie watching has been met with reactions from all across the spectrum. People have come to love it, some to hate it, while others believe it’s all about the quality of the movie and how the 3D is used. As for the video game world, there is 3D out there right now. However, it requires glasses and a whole lot of financial investment. Which is why it’s really not doing well at the moment.

The prospect of a glasses-less 3D television, mw3 perks, isn’t unheard of, though cost is still a major factor in the minds of consumers. One wonders if Nintendo is watching this all unfold while thinking up ideas for their next console. If they’re looking at releasing a console in the next 2-3 years, do trends show 3D televisions making more a push during this time? If this is the case, will Nintendo take that chance?

The problem with bringing 3D to a console, compared to a handheld, is Nintendo has no control over the display. How much of a market would Nintendo have selling only to 3D TV owning consumers?

While 3D gaming looks to be amazing on the 3DS, this author is highly skeptical as to the impact it will have in the living room. In the next 3-5 years anyway.

3D Nintendo

The first question to ask is – does Nintendo need saving? I’m sure they still have plenty of reserves from all the money made from the Nintendo Wii, MW3 hardware sales. Not to mention all the profit made from the accessories sold. However, 2010 wasn’t a stellar year for the company we love so much. The other consoles played catchup, and the hot trend of Wii ownership petered out. Not to mention Microsoft and Sony releasing motion control options for their perspective consoles.

Nintendo did have an ace up their sleeve, and it came during the E3 presentation earlier in the year. The Nintendo 3DS was announced, and with it came a handheld which would provide 3D gaming without the need of glasses. Amazement ensued.

Here we are in 2011, and the 3DS is a few months away from launch. The hype surrounding the system is still growing strong, as there has been announcements coming this week concerning more of the technical specs. Along with more information regarding the games coming out.

With all of this hype, one has to wonder if 3D will be the next shift for Nintendo. It is most definitely a technological feat to release a 3D handheld with the capabilities the 3DS will have. Could the handheld be a peak at what Nintendo has planned for the living room?

The whole 3D trend has been interesting to watch unfold, like in cod ghosts. In the theaters, the prospect of 3D movie watching has been met with reactions from all across the spectrum, like with the 48 fps debate. People have come to love it, some to hate it, while others believe it’s all about the quality of the movie and how the 3D is used in call of duty ghost multiplayer. As for the video game world, there is 3D out there right now. However, it requires glasses and a whole lot of financial investment. Which is why it’s really not doing well at the moment.

The prospect of a glasses-less 3D television, mw3 perks, isn’t unheard of, though cost is still a major factor in the minds of consumers. One wonders if Nintendo is watching this all unfold while thinking up ideas for their next console. If they’re looking at releasing a console in the next 2-3 years, do trends show 3D televisions making more a push during this time? If this is the case, will Nintendo take that chance?

The problem with bringing 3D to a console, compared to a handheld, is Nintendo has no control over the display. How much of a market would Nintendo have selling only to 3D TV owning consumers?

While 3D gaming looks to be amazing on the 3DS, this author is highly skeptical as to the impact it will have in the living room. In the next 3-5 years anyway.

Using the infrared camera in the Wii remote and a head mounted sensor bar (two IR LEDs), you can accurately track the location of your head and render view dependent images on the screen. This effectively transforms your display into a portal to a virtual environment. The display properly reacts to head and body movement as if it were a real window creating a realistic illusion of depth and space. By Johnny Chung Lee, Carnegie Mellon University. For more information and software visit johnnylee.net

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 Head Tracking for Desktop VR Displays using the WiiRemote

Using the infrared camera in the Wii remote and a head mounted sensor bar (two IR LEDs), you can accurately track the location of your head and render view dependent images on the screen. This effectively transforms your display into a portal to a virtual environment. The display properly reacts to head and body movement as if it were a real window creating a realistic illusion of depth and space. By Johnny Chung Lee, Carnegie Mellon University. For more information and software visit johnnylee.net

email post Head Tracking for Desktop VR Displays using the WiiRemote Mail this post

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 Head Tracking for Desktop VR Displays using the WiiRemote

With the Nintendo DSi XL landing in the offices of the gaming press this week, Nintendo saw fit to announce its newest product in its portable line: the Nintendo 3DS. The company gave limited details via a press release in Japan; we know the system will use two screens, won't require any sort of special glasses, and will be backwards compatible with current DS and DSi games.

The system will be released before the end of the fiscal year, which means the latest we'll see it in Japan is next March. The system is expected to make an appearance at this year's E3, and we'll surely be given more information before then. For now, Nintendo has yet to release any images of the system, or how games will look, or be played.

So how will the 3D effect be displayed? We posted a video of a downloadable game that's out now in Japan that uses head tracking to simulate a 3D image, and since then we've had time to try the game on a friend's Japanese DSi during GDC. By tracking the motion of the system in relation to your eyes, you seem to be able to peer "into" the picture by turning the system this way and that. It's a surprisingly effective effect, and some iteration of this system may be used in the 3DS.

Nintendo has a history of announcing hardware upgrades and features that may seem silly at first glance before going on to become huge success. Many scoffed at the idea of the Nintendo Wii, until lines to play the system at its first E3 showing stretched around the convention. 3D is fresh in the minds of consumers after the success of Avatar, and 3D-capable televisions are expected to make a splash at retail this year. A portable system that works with all your old games and won't require glasses? It could be the right product at the right time.

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