Apple


This week, our top Apple news discussed Apple's first update to Lion, why Nintendo won't dive into iOS devices just yet, fake Apple stores in China, and Apple's actions against Samsung in Europe. There's also some renewed buzz about Apple's still-unannounced fall Apple event, as well as new rumors about LTE iPhones. Read on for the roundup:

22 more "fake" Apple Stores found in China; how many more are there?: First, the Internet went crazy over a blogger's account of an "Apple Store" in China that happened to be entirely unauthorized. Then two were shut down. Now, 22 more have been ordered to quit using Apple's trademarks in China. But this is just the beginning.

We may want Mario on the iPhone, but Nintendo won't slit own throat: Nintendo has so far refused to release games for Apple's popular mobile devices. With slagging sales of the Wii and the lackluster launch of the 3DS causing the company a loss for the second quarter, investors are asking the company to reconsider. But it won't happen as long as president Satoru Iwata is in charge.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post


Nintendo's investors are urging the company to bring its iconic game characters, like Mario, Luigi, Zelda, and Donkey Kong, to Apple's iPhone and iPad. The call to make games for Apple's hit mobile devices, which have fueled success for companies like PopCap and Rovio, comes after lackluster sales of Nintendo's latest 3DS handheld have driven prices of the company's stock to a 6-year low.

But despite the allure of selling millions of copies of a touchscreen-enabled Super Mario title to some 200 million iOS users, who on average play 14.7 hours of games per month, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata will have none of it.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post


Apple appears to be getting on board with a trend that other companies have already made significant headway on: wirelessly transferring content between devices with different owners. PatentlyApple has dug up a patent application from last year showing the various ways Apple thinks consumers might want to flick, vacuum, or pour files from one device to another.

Apple took a big step toward seamless content transfers with the introduction of iCloud, but that only handles the devices of one user. Apple's competitors are currently a step ahead when it comes to sharing information between devices that aren't necessarily tied to the same user account. (For example, Google has the unreleased Deep Shot, while HP has webOS's Touch to Share.)

In its patent application, Apple shows various ways that files could be sent from one device to another, such as "pouring"—tipping the first gadget over the second like a tea kettle and letting the files tumble out. Another method involves moving one device—say, an iPhone—over the display of another, like an iPad. While the iPhone moves over the surface of the iPad, it would suck up the displayed files, like a vacuum.

Another sharing method strongly resembles the capabilities of the upcoming Wii U controller. Apple proposes that one device could send a file, picture, or piece of data to another by simply flicking it in that device's direction, even across a room. Apple also includes examples in the application of this sharing method being used to move files to broader categories of computer devices, like projection screens or electronic whiteboards.

The patent application is mostly conceptual and lacks technical details, such as whether devices sharing with each other would have to be connected via Bluetooth. And, as always, a patent application doesn't mean it will be implemented. Still, we expect Apple to move on these transferring techniques soon, given the progress of similar technologies from competitors. After all, what's a shiny gadget owner to do when he wants to show his friends a picture—let them handle his phone with their greasy fingers?

Read the comments on this post


Apple appears to be getting on board with a trend that other companies have already made significant headway on: wirelessly transferring content between devices with different owners. PatentlyApple has dug up a patent application showing the various ways Apple thinks consumers might want to flick, vacuum, or pour files from one device to another.

Apple took a big step toward seamless content transfers with the introduction of iCloud, but that only handles the devices of one user. Apple's competitors are currently a step ahead when it comes to sharing information between devices that aren't necessarily tied to the same user account. (For example, Google has the unreleased Deep Shot, while HP has webOS's Touch to Share.)

In its patent application, Apple shows various ways that files could be sent from one device to another, such as "pouring"—tipping the first gadget over the second like a tea kettle and letting the files tumble out. Another method involves moving one device—say, an iPhone—over the display of another, like an iPad. While the iPhone moves over the surface of the iPad, it would suck up the displayed files, like a vacuum.

Another sharing method strongly resembles the capabilities of the upcoming Wii U controller. Apple proposes that one device could send a file, picture, or piece of data to another by simply flicking it in that device's direction, even across a room. Apple also includes examples in the application of this sharing method being used to move files to broader categories of computer devices, like projection screens or electronic whiteboards.

The patent application is mostly conceptual and lacks technical details, such as whether devices sharing with each other would have to be connected via Bluetooth. And, as always, a patent application doesn't mean it will be implemented. Still, we expect Apple to move on these transferring techniques soon, given the progress of similar technologies from competitors. After all, what's a shiny gadget owner to do when he wants to show his friends a picture—let them handle his phone with their greasy fingers?

Read the comments on this post


The new Apple TV has been delayed into October, but Apple has already rolled out its new iTunes TV show rental service with the iTunes 10 update. Disney/ABC and Fox are on board with the new 99¢ TV episode rental service while other broadcast and cable networks have criticized the service, leery of "devaluing" their content with low prices. Yet some of those same networks are willing to offer their content via Netflix instant streaming for fixed fees.

During a Goldman Sachs investor conference in New York this week, a number of media executives expressed concern that Apple's 99¢ price point is too low. "The 99¢ rental is not a good price point," Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman said. "It doesn't work for us." Viacom operates several cable networks, such as MTV, Comedy Central, and Nickelodeon.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post


The new Apple TV has been delayed into October, but Apple has already rolled out its new iTunes TV show rental service with the iTunes 10 update. Disney/ABC and Fox are on board with the new 99¢ TV episode rental service while other broadcast and cable networks have criticized the service, leery of "devaluing" their content with low prices. Yet some of those same networks are willing to offer their content via Netflix instant streaming for fixed fees.

During a Goldman Sachs investor conference in New York this week, a number of media executives expressed concern that Apple's 99¢ price point is too low. "The 99¢ rental is not a good price point," Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman said. "It doesn't work for us." Viacom operates several cable networks, such as MTV, Comedy Central, and Nickelodeon.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post


Last weekend there were reports that iTunes and the App Store had been hacked. However, it turned out that a developer had used other users' iTunes accounts to buy his apps repeatedly, quickly moving the apps up the App Store sales ranking. It now appears that another developer, WiiSHii Network, has started doing the same thing.

Ars reader Harper Reed contacted us to detail the problem. His account was used earlier today to purchase 34 of WiiSHii Network's apps without his permission, for a total of $168.89. The apps appear to mostly be travel guides for cities in China, and come in both English and Chinese versions—oddly enough, Reed ostensibly bought both.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post


Junk apps have been on the rise in the App Store, with some developers hoping to cash in on popular searches by offering "cheat" apps that ostensibly help you conquer the game you're really searching for. I noticed this myself recently when I went looking for Words With Friends. Developer Marco Arment dug a little bit deeper and believes these apps may be crossing into some legal gray areas. The good news, however, is that there's something that both developers and users can do about it.

Arment pointed out that many of these apps use icons, application names, and in some cases, other artwork that could constitute copyright or trademark violations. We found dozens of apps that use icons and logos for iPhone games like Words With Friends, Angry Birds, We Rule, and The Sims, as well as apps that purport to offer cheats for console games like Super Mario Bros Wii, Mario Kart, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Modern Warfare 2.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post