launch


Nintendo today announced first-week sales of 400,000 Wii U systems in North America, falling short of the mark set by the first Wii, but surpassing early sales of previous high-definition systems.

American corporate president Reggie Fils-Aime told CNet sales of the new system have been limited only by Nintendo's ability to get product to stores. "Retailers are also doing their best to get the product to store shelves, but as soon as product hits retail, they're selling out immediately," Fils-Aime said, gelling with reports from retailers like GameStop that explicitly noted in Black Friday ads that they had no hardware stock to sell.

The original Wii sold over 600,000  units in the Americas in the eight days following its November 2006 launch, which also overlapped with Black Friday. Indeed, the Wii was nearly impossible to find on store shelves for months following launch, selling millions of systems in that time.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments


A day-one firmware update is causing headaches for some new Wii U owners, according to reports circulating online. Consoles that lose power while the massive new system software is being downloaded and installed are reportedly being bricked.

L.A. Times reporter Ben Fritz is one of the most prominent people to tweet that his system was rendered useless by an interruption during the roughly 5GB download, which took over an hour to complete in our tests. Other users on Twitter and gaming forums around the Internet are reporting similar issues. While most users are reporting power interruptions as the cause of the bricked consoles, some reports suggest that losing an Internet connection during the download may cause similar problems.

Out of the box, the Wii U isn't useful for much more than playing games. The launch-day update is needed to activate system features ranging from the new Miiverse social network and online eShop to the ability to play older Wii games on the system.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments


For months now, Nintendo has been positioning the Wii U not just as a game-playing machine, but as a living room video hub. It offers support for Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Instant Video, and YouTube all integrated with your TiVo and live TV through a service called Nintendo TVii. Now, just two days before the system is set to launch in North America, Nintendo has revealed that not all of those services will be available when the Wii U hits store shelves.

In a press release listing the Wii U's features that hit the wires early Friday, Nintendo buried the little nugget that Nintendo TVii will launch sometime in December, with the integrated video-on-demand apps being rolled out "in the coming weeks." While it looks like Nintendo never previously said that these features would be available on launch day, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime said during a September news conference that these features would be "included in every Wii U purchase" at no additional cost.

Frankly, today's announcement just adds to our worries about the Wii U's online features. The prelaunch hardware provided to the press is currently not capable of doing much more than playing games. Functions like the online game store, Miiverse social networking, video chat, a web browser and even the ability to transfer content from an old Wii to a new Wii U won't be available until Nintendo rolls out a downloadable software update. The company has promised this update will be available for Sunday's North American launch, but at T-minus 36 hours, it has yet to be released.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments


For months now, Nintendo has been positioning the Wii U not just as a game-playing machine, but as a living room video hub. It offers support for Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Instant Video, and YouTube, all integrated with your TiVo and live TV through a service called Nintendo TVii. Now, just two days before the system is set to launch in North America, Nintendo has revealed that not all of those services will be available when the Wii U hits store shelves.

(UPDATE: A Netflix representative clarified to Engadget that the service would be ready for the Wii U's Sunday launch but won't be integrated into Nintendo TVii until early next year)

In a press release listing the Wii U's features that hit the wires early Friday, Nintendo buried the little nugget that Nintendo TVii will launch sometime in December, with the integrated video-on-demand apps being rolled out "in the coming weeks." While it looks like Nintendo never previously said that these features would be available on launch day, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime said during a September news conference that the features would be "included in every Wii U purchase" at no additional cost.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Nintendo is pinning a lot of hopes on Nintendo Land as a launch day system seller for the Wii U.

Earlier this month, when Nintendo revealed many of the final details about the worldwide launch of the Wii U, the company listed 50 games that would be available for the system in North America during a nebulous "launch window" that runs from November 18, 2012 to the end of March 2013. Today, Nintendo nailed down the Wii U's launch software lineup with a bit more detail, announcing 23 games that will be in stores when the system launches on November 18, with eight more available by the end of November.

Notably, heavily promoted Nintendo-developed titles like Pikmin 3, Wii Fit U, and Game & Wario will not be available on launch day, leaving just New Super Mario Bros. U and mini-game collection Nintendo Land to represent first-party development on day one. Ubisoft will be providing a few worthwhile launch-day exclusives for the system in the form of the charming Scribblenauts Unlimited and augmented reality horror game ZombiU, but Wii U owners will have to wait for other promising exclusives like Lego City: Undercover, The Wonderful 101, and Rayman Legends.

The vast majority of the games available for the Wii U on day one will be ports of games already available on existing systems. Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 is by far the most important of these, marking the bestselling series' return to Nintendo systems after a long absence, but the Wii U version will necessarily be coming five days after the system hits PC, PS3, and Xbox 360 on November 13.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Nintendo is pinning a lot of hopes on Nintendo Land as a launch day system seller for the Wii U.

Earlier this month, when Nintendo revealed many of the final details about the worldwide launch of the Wii U, the company listed 50 games that would be available for the system in North America during a nebulous "launch window" that runs from November 18, 2012 to the end of March 2013. Today, Nintendo nailed down the Wii U's launch software lineup with a bit more detail, announcing 23 games that will be in stores when the system launches on November 18, with eight more available by the end of November.

Notably, heavily promoted Nintendo-developed titles like Pikmin 3, Wii Fit U, and Game & Wario will not be available on launch day, leaving just New Super Mario Bros. U and mini-game collection Nintendo Land to represent first-party development on day one. Ubisoft will be providing a few worthwhile launch-day exclusives for the system in the form of the charming Scribblenauts Unlimited and augmented reality horror game ZombiU, but Wii U owners will have to wait for other promising exclusives like Lego City: Undercover, The Wonderful 101, and Rayman Legends.

The vast majority of the games available for the Wii U on day one will be ports of games already available on existing systems. Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 is by far the most important of these, marking a true HD port of the game on a Nintendo system, but the Wii U version will necessarily be coming five days after the system hits PC, PS3, and Xbox 360 on November 13. (UPDATE: the original article incorrectly stated that Call of Duty had been absent from the Wii in recent years)

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments


From the system's first unveiling at E3 2011 to Thursday's final announcement of launch details, Nintendo has been releasing information about its next home console, the Wii U, in bits and pieces for about 15 months now. Unless you've been closely following all those data drops, you may have missed some important details about Nintendo's future hardware plans.

That's where we come in. The below FAQ collects all the pertinent information we currently know about the Wii U.

Basic information

Q: So when is this thing coming out?

Read 63 remaining paragraphs | Comments


From the system's first unveiling at E3 2011 to Thursday's final announcement of launch details, Nintendo has been releasing information about its next home console, the Wii U, in bits and pieces for about 15 months now. Unless you've been closely following all those data drops, you may have missed some important details about Nintendo's future hardware plans.

That's where we come in. The below FAQ collects all the pertinent information we currently know about the Wii U.

Basic information

Q: So when is this thing coming out?

Read 63 remaining paragraphs | Comments


At a press event today in New York, Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime announced that the Wii U will launch in the United States on Sunday, November 18.

The system will come in two configurations: A white basic set at $299.99 that comes with 8GB on built-in memory, plus a Wii U GamePad, AC adapter, and HDMI cable. A black deluxe set, costing $349.99, will include everything in the basic bundle plus 32GB of total flash storage, a GamePad charging cradle, stands for the GamePad and console, and a copy of NintendoLand. The deluxe edition will also let users redeem points for every digital download purchased for the system.

Neither configuration will include a Wii Remote or Nunchuk because, Fils-Aime said, "we don't want to require people repurchasing these accessories that they already own."

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Nintendo's upcoming Wii U console will launch in its native Japan in two configurations starting at ¥26,250 (about $337) on December 8, the company has announced.

In a pre-recorded video streamed to the Internet, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata revealed a "basic" white version of the system at that price with 8 GB of built-in Flash memory storage. A "premium" black system will also be available for ¥31,500 ($405), including 32 GB of on-board storage as well as a system stand, a GamePad charging cradle, and a separate GamePad display stand (the system stand will be sold separately for ¥315 (about $4) while the two controller stands will be available as a bundle for ¥1,890 (about $24)).

Buying the premium system will also give users access to "Nintendo Network Premium," which will offer users a 10 percent credit on digital purchases made for the system.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Next Page »