tablet


Tomorrow, Nintendo is set to give us the final details on what we can expect from the Wii U's launch later this year. Yesterday and today, Ars readers shared their thoughts on what they want to hear from Nintendo, and what (if anything) could convince them to purchase the system, either at launch or after.

The more than 200 comments we received ran the gamut from Nintendo haters to self-described fanboys, with plenty of people falling somewhere in between. Here are some of the most interesting, thought-provoking, or just representative comments from the Ars readership.

Fool me once, shame on me...

By far the most common sentiment among the Ars readership was to hold off on the Wii U simply because Nintendo had failed to deliver a compelling experience with the original Wii. Commenter superslav23 said the experience of the Wii taught him to expect "the same games slightly changed to use the gimmicky tablet." damarv said he loved the Wii's motion controls as a concept, but complained that "rather than improving my physical abilities, I ended up jiggling a controller around."

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Tomorrow, Nintendo is set to give us the final details on what we can expect from the Wii U's launch later this year. Yesterday and today, Ars readers shared their thoughts on what they want to hear from Nintendo, and what (if anything) could convince them to purchase the system, either at launch or after.

The more than 200 comments we received ran the gamut from Nintendo haters to self-described fanboys, with plenty of people falling somewhere in between. Here are some of the most interesting, thought-provoking, or just representative comments from the Ars readership.

Fool me once, shame on me...

By far the most common sentiment among the Ars readership was to hold off on the Wii U simply because Nintendo had failed to deliver a compelling experience with the original Wii. Commenter superslav23 said the experience of the Wii taught him to expect "the same games slightly changed to use the gimmicky tablet." damarv said he loved the Wii's motion controls as a concept, but complained that "rather than improving my physical abilities, I ended up jiggling a controller around."

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Tomorrow, Nintendo is set to give us the final details on what we can expect from the Wii U's launch later this year. Yesterday and today, Ars readers shared their thoughts on what they want to hear from Nintendo, and what (if anything) could convince them to purchase the system, either at launch or after.

The more than 200 comments we received ran the gamut from Nintendo haters to self-described fanboys, with plenty of people falling somewhere in between. Here are some of the most interesting, thought-provoking, or just representative comments from the Ars readership.

Fool me once, shame on me...

By far the most common sentiment among the Ars readership was to hold off on the Wii U simply because Nintendo had failed to deliver a compelling experience with the original Wii. Commenter superslav23 said the experience of the Wii taught him to expect "the same games slightly changed to use the gimmicky tablet." damarv said he loved the Wii's motion controls as a concept, but complained that "rather than improving my physical abilities, I ended up jiggling a controller around."

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Tomorrow, Nintendo is set to give us the final details on what we can expect from the Wii U's launch later this year. Yesterday and today, Ars readers shared their thoughts on what they want to hear from Nintendo, and what (if anything) could convince them to purchase the system, either at launch or after.

The more than 200 comments we received ran the gamut from Nintendo haters to self-described fanboys, with plenty of people falling somewhere in between. Here are some of the most interesting, thought-provoking, or just representative comments from the Ars readership.

Fool me once, shame on me...

By far the most common sentiment among the Ars readership was to hold off on the Wii U simply because Nintendo had failed to deliver a compelling experience with the original Wii. Commenter superslav23 said the experience of the Wii taught him to expect "the same games slightly changed to use the gimmicky tablet." damarv said he loved the Wii's motion controls as a concept, but complained that "rather than improving my physical abilities, I ended up jiggling a controller around."

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments


Whatever it ends up costing, don't forget you're also getting a TV remote control for your money!

Amidst all the talk of the Wii U and its unique, touchscreen-equipped GamePad at this year's E3, one of the major specifications missing from the discussion was the massive controller's price. The mystery surrounding that pricing remains a major concern for those considering a purchase of the system, and according to Nintendo President Satoru Iwata, it was also a major concern for the company while the system was still in the design phase.

"Sometime during that final discussion [of the system's design], we almost gave up on the idea of the additional screen," Iwata said in an interview with London's Telegraph newspaper. "This was due to our concern over the expected high cost; it may not have been feasible to create this and sell it at a reasonable price point for the consumers."

The Telegraph interview goes on to suggest that Nintendo eventually figured the cost situation out, suggesting that it will be able to offer the controller for that "reasonable price point" at launch (for Nintendo's definition of reasonable, at least). That price could be more important than ever, as Nintendo announced at E3 that the Wii U would be able to support games that use two GamePads at once, though no such games will be available at launch.

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Nintendo president Satoru Iwata holds the new Wii U controller design.

Promising that Nintendo's pre-E3 press conference on Tuesday will focus "almost entirely on games," company president Satoru Iwata used a streaming Web presentation today to announce new details about the unique tablet controller and social functions of the upcoming Wii U.

Iwata began a bit philosophically, showing a picture of a standard nuclear family sitting together in a living room, each member with their head buried in their own separate digital screens. "People are gathered together in the same room with friends and family, but they are not truly connected. They are paying more attention to their devices than each other."

Referencing Shelly Turkel's book Alone Together, he acknowledged that technology has improved our lives, but added that "we have to wonder what this will mean for the nature of human relationships moving forward."

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Using infrared (IR) light pens and the Wii Remote, it is possible to create very low-cost multi-point interactive whiteboards and multi-point tablet displays. Johnny Chung Lee, Carnegie Mellon University. The software can be downloaded at johnnylee.net

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 Low Cost Multi touch Whiteboard using the Wiimote